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Research Articles

Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: prevalence, risk factors and causative organisms

Authors:

Jennifer Perera ,

Senior Professor of Microbiology Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, LK
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Cyril Randeniya,

Associate Professor in Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, LK
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Piyumi Perera,

Research Assistant Department of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine, Colombo, Sri Lanka, LK
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Nimesha Gamhewage,

Research Assistant Department of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine, Colombo, Sri Lanka, LK
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Renuka Jayalatharchchi

Medical Laboratory Technologist Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, LK
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Abstract

Untreated bacteriuria  during pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. It is cost effective to screen for bacteriuria if the prevalence rate is 2% or more. The prevalence rate in this study was 3.6%.  The 67% of the aetilogical agents belonged to the coliform group balance 33% were staphylococci. All isolates were sensitive to nitrofurantoin. There was no association between bacteriuria and risk factors, gestational diabetes, past urinary tract infection, multiparity, advanced maternal age, lower education level, advanced gestational age, and lower socioeconomic status. Screening of pregnant mothers is reported to be cost effective if the prevalence rates are ≥2%. It is recommended to screen pregnant mothers early in their pregnancy and treat those with significant bacteriuria as this would significantly minimize the adverse maternal and foetal outcomes.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4038/sljid.v2i1.3810

Sri Lankan Journal of Infectious Diseases Vol.2(1) 2012: 41-45

How to Cite: Perera, J. et al., (2012). Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: prevalence, risk factors and causative organisms. Sri Lankan Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2(1), pp.42–46. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/sljid.v2i1.3810
Published on 31 Jan 2012.
Peer Reviewed

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